Sea Shelf Extension

 

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Sea Shelf Extension
The Arctic Council
Northern Strategy

 

 

Continental sea shelf extension means mapping the seabed to show that it is an extension of the continental shelf. The practice is based on article 76 of UNCLOS and could allow Canada to ask for an extension of its EEZ.

 

Canada filed a submission to define the outer limits of its continental shelf in the Atlantic Ocean with the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf on December 9, 2013. At the same time, Canada filed preliminary information concerning the outer limits of its continental shelf in the Arctic Ocean.

 

 

Article 76 of UNCLOS defines the conditions under which a country can determine the delimitation for an extended Continental Shelf beyond 200 nautical miles.

http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/science/hydrography-hydrographie/unclos-eng.html

 

 

 

The red line shows the 200-nautical-mile Exclusive Economic Zone

The white line shows the possible outer limits of the continental shelf beyond 200 nautical miles

http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/science/hydrography-hydrographie/unclos-eng.html

 

Read more on Canada’s Extended Continental Shelf

http://www.international.gc.ca/arctic-arctique/continental/index.aspx?lang=eng

"Canada's claim to Arctic riches includes the North Pole" by Max Paris, CBC News, Dec 09, 2013

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canada-s-claim-to-arctic-riches-includes-the-north-pole-1.2456773

 

Canada is not the only country engaged in the process of continental sea shelf extension. Russia already submitted its claim to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf. Canada has been cooperating with Denmark and the US to map the Arctic seabed.

 

 

 

 

The Resource Potential of the Arctic: A Geopolitical Perspective. Klaus Dodds (RHUL). Slide 23

http://www.iccgov.org/FilePagineStatiche/Files/EVENTS/Conferences/2013/Arctic/Presentations/Dodds.pdf